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[personal profile] realexplodingcat
I think this audio version of "Cell" is the first "traditional" Stephen King novel I've experienced in perhaps seven years. I did reread and catch up on the Dark Tower series, finally finishing it, but that isn't his typical horror thing. I'm remembering how, when I first discovered King in eighth grade, I used to read his books for all the scenes of graphic violence. Now, I'm reading it for all the stuff in between and actually don't care for all the blood (although without the blood, the stuff in between probably isn't as good). It makes me wonder if I should go back and reread (or listen to) the books I read as a surly teenager, so I can pay attention to the parts I rushed through.

In other news, [livejournal.com profile] krasota is making turkey broth. She threw a little bit of everything in the pot with a turkey carcass and intends to simmer it all night long. I like to call it primordial soup, because there is a chance (albeit a slim one) that life will arise in that stock pot, boil itself over, and slime its way across the floor to watch TV in my office.

Date: 2008-01-25 06:19 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] flynnk.livejournal.com
Don't you need lightning for that?

Date: 2008-01-25 01:34 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] explodingcat.livejournal.com
I figure leaving the stove on all night unattended might provide that :)

Date: 2008-01-25 12:29 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] silent-muse.livejournal.com
I think I've always liked Mr. King for that reason. I remember someone saying the thing they hated about King was they could flip a hundred pages and miss very little in the story because he'd spent so much time on characterization. Then they asked me why I liked him, and I just shrugged and said "Well. . . that. . ."

Date: 2008-01-25 01:40 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] explodingcat.livejournal.com
It's true. Even though he is the self-proclaimed "literary equivalent of a Big Mac and fries," and many critics agree, he does have an extraordinary ability to capture ordinary Americans of the late 20th and early 21st centuries in his characters. For that reason, I think he will be read long after he his gone, both seriously and for pleasure.

Date: 2008-01-25 03:29 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] seeliespright.livejournal.com
I had a moment of primordial oozing last night: I mixed the yeast with water and left it for 10 mins (waiting for 2cm of foam) and when I returned, I found it 8cm over the top of the cup. I was like, "Holy crap, batman!"

Date: 2008-01-25 03:32 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] explodingcat.livejournal.com
The yeast shall inherit the Earth!

Date: 2008-01-25 06:07 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] briskpepper.livejournal.com
I had a friend that was really into King in high school. he was such an elitist prick, i made it a personal mission to avoid anything anything he touched that i wasn't already an equally elitist prick about.

I like the in-between spaces of almost everything.

Date: 2008-01-25 07:55 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] explodingcat.livejournal.com
Stephen King is a weird thing to be elitist about. I can see Marcel Proust or James Joyce, but King? That's like being elitist about American Idol winners. I mean, assuming the winners get pig blood dumped on them.
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